Astonishing Macro Photography trending on #MacroMonday yesterday from Google+.

Photo by Levi Moore

No one warned me about the addictive nature of photography, especially when it comes to lenses. I figured one camera body and one lens would be all I ever needed.  Soon, I realized the power and the difference that variable focal lengths make in your shot. For example, if you want to get incredibly detailed uber close-up shots like the ones below I found trending on Google+ #MacroMonday, it might just be time to consider investing in a good macro lens. I’ve put together some guidelines at the bottom to help you choose what you need.  You’ll also want to get a tripod for a steady shot. I know, it adds up. But hey, you deserve it.

Photo by Mustafa Tanrıverdi

If you thinks it’s hard to get a focused shot of a person’s eyes, well, magnify that times 1000. This is about as close to a bug as I want to be. Brilliant.

Photo by Jaz Emminger

Ouch and “WOW.” This shot creates both an interesting pattern and emotional reaction by juxtaposing sharp metal and tender skin.  Nice job, Jaz.

Photo by Miah Schmid

I must admit, I’m not a huge fan of cats. But look at the eyes on this one. Especially love the unique composition of flipping the cat on its head. No pun intended.

Photo by Fred Brundick

Short depths of field singling out a particular area of the subject using sharp focus is just one of the things making macro photography so special.

Photo by Allinclusive Vac

I love the moment captured in this shot. The black seahorse silhouettes against the deep blue sea is simply magnificent.

Photo by Sharon Jeannette

The beauty of black and white photography is magnified when all the details are up close. Perfect exposure. Love how the leaf appears out of complete darkness.

Photo by Beth Ackerman

Here is a guide to choosing the right lens for  Macro Photography, depending on what you like to shoot.

-45–65 mm – product photography, small objects that can be approached closely without causing undesirable influence, and scenes requiring natural background perspective

-90–105 mm – insects, flowers, and small objects from a comfortable distance

-150–200 mm – insects and other small animals where additional working distance is required

 

Which shot is your favorite?  I love them all or I wouldn’t have posted these out of the hundreds posted just yesterday. Thanks to all the very talented shooters out there! Keep on snapping!

About Maureen

Comments

  1. Oh, I thought Jaz’s photo was a mushroom at first! These are all great shots.

  2. My favorite shot is the cat because, well, I’m a cat person!

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